How Do I Convert ACT Score to an SAT Score?

How do I convert ACT score to a similar SAT score? This question comes up often, and even I have to use a conversion table on a regular basis. For the Class of 2017, it is even more complicated because we need separate conversion tables for the old SAT and new SAT.

Because the SAT and ACT test have completely different scoring, you will need the conversion tables below to compare an ACT score into an SAT score. After you convert ACT score to SAT equivalent, don't forget to read my recommendations for Best ACT prep books and Best SAT prep books and good luck!!

Convert ACT Score to New SAT

Many of the conversion tables floating around on the Internet are now outdated since the New SAT arrived in March 2016. Here are the newly released ACT-New SAT conversion chart. The chart below compares the ACT Composite score to the combined Math-Reading sections of the New SAT.

ACT vs SAT

36  =  1600

35  =  1570

34  =  1540

33  =  1500

32  =  1470

31  =  1430

30  = 1400

29  = 1360

28 = 1320

27  = 1290

26  = 1260

25 = 1220

24  = 1180

23  = 1140

22  = 1110

21  = 1070

20 = 1030

19  = 990

18  = 950

17  = 910

16 = 870

15  = 830

14  = 780

13  = 740

12  = 680

Online Calculator

Note: Students are not required to take both tests (or submit scores from both tests if taken). Students would spend time and energy studying for whichever test they feel will ultimately yield the highest score. Don't forget to check out my book recommendations for the ACT and/or SAT that I use to tutor my students. 


Convert ACT Score to SAT for Single Sections

Remember, the ACT Composite score is the average of the four ACT sections (English, Math, Reading, and Science), and yes, the ACT does round up (so if the average was 26.5, the Composite score would be 27). If you want to compare, for example, your ACT Math and SAT Math scores, you will need the conversion table below.

ACT vs SAT

36  =  800

35  =  785

34  =  770

33  =  750

32  =  735

31  =  715

30  = 700

29  = 680

28 = 660

27  = 645

26  = 630

25 = 610

24  = 590

23  = 570

22  = 555

21  = 540

20 = 515

19  = 495

18  = 475

17  = 455

16 = 435

15  = 415

14  = 390

13  = 370

12  = 340

For example, if a student scored a 27 on the Reading section of the ACT, the score would be equivalent to 645 on the New SAT, or if a student scored a 32 on the Math section of the ACT, the score would be 735 on the New SAT. Remember, the more selective the college, the more likely to compare not only the total score but also the separate section scores as well.


How Do I Convert ACT Score to Old SAT?

The conversion table below compares the ACT Composite score to the OLD SAT score (which is the sum of Critical Reading, Math, and Writing section score). Only Class of 2017 had the option of submitting test scores from the New and Old SAT (given January 2016 and earlier).

ACT vs SAT

36  =  2400

35  =  2340

34  =  2260

33  =  2190

32  =  2130

31  =  2040

30  = 1980

29  = 1920

28 = 1860

27  = 1820

26  = 1760

25 = 1700

24  = 1650

23  = 1590

22  = 1530

21  = 1500

20 = 1410

19  = 1350

18  = 1290

17  = 1210

16 = 1140

15  = 1060

14  = 1000

13  = 900

12  = 780

Should I Send Scores From Both Tests?

Is there an advantage to sending score results from BOTH tests? Typically, no. The only case would be if a student scored EQUALLY well on both tests. Avoid sending in lower test scores on one exam because it could weaken your overall application, especially at highly selective colleges. If your ACT score compare to SAT score is much higher, just send the scores.

Test Optional: Good Choice For Some Students

Worried you do not have a good score on the ACT or SAT? Don't forget to read about colleges and universities that offer test-optional admissions (that's right, these schools do not require students to take the ACT or SAT exams to be admitted).

News & Updates

Several times each week, I post articles and test taking tips about the SAT and ACT tests as well as college admissions. These blog entries are a great way to keep current with what is happening in high school test prep and college admissions. So please bookmark this page (or subscribe to my RSS feed) and let your friends and family know about TestPrepCoach.com!